The Inquirer-Home

Microsoft releases an Office 365 app for the iPhone

Updated But it's not available yet in the UK
Fri Jun 14 2013, 12:51
Microsoft Office Mobile for Apple iOS devices

SOFTWARE HOUSE Microsoft has finally gritted its teeth and released an Office Mobile app for the iPhone, although it's not available yet in the UK.

The app is available only in the US though a Microsoft Office 365 subscription. However, when signed in, subscribers have the ability to access and edit Word, Excel and Powerpoint documents stored in Skydrive or Sharepoint, and Microsoft says that users can edit, read and share documents straight from their iPhones.

Users will also need a data connection to access files, although documents can be edited offline.

Microsoft boasts, "Office Mobile is the official Office companion optimized for your iPhone. You can access, view and edit your Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Powerpoint documents from virtually anywhere.

"Documents look like the originals, thanks to support for charts, animations, Smartart graphics and shapes. When you make quick edits or add comments to a document, the formatting and content remain intact."

Other features include the ability to swipe through Powerpoint presentations, create new documents straight from the iPhone and resume what you're doing from a PC or tablet.

For those in the US, Microsoft Office for iPhone is available to download for free from the iTunes Store and is compatible with handsets running iOS 6.1 or later. There's no iPad version available yet, and it's unclear whether Microsoft has a tablet optimised version in development.

Microsoft has told us that the app will be available outside of the UK "over the next few days," although no exact release date was given. µ 

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?