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Facebook copies Twitter with hashtag support

Tapping into chatty traffic
Thu Jun 13 2013, 09:49
A Facebook logo

SOCIAL NETWORK Facebook has started letting its members use hashtags.

Hashtags are a feature of Twitter and a few other websites, and they are used to refer to the subject of a message, for example #facebookhashtags.

Facebook watched their use for some time, and now it has adopted them. This means that online conversations about news events, TV shows, sports matches and other hot topics can proceed at its social media website using the same shorthand references. 

Facebook project manager Greg Lindley introduced the adoption of hashtags and explained that they will work at Facebook just as they do everywhere else.

"Starting today, hashtags will be clickable on Facebook. Similar to other services like Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, or Pinterest, hashtags on Facebook allow you to add context to a post or indicate that it is part of a larger discussion. When you click on a hashtag in Facebook, you'll see a feed of what other people and Pages are saying about that event or topic," he said.

"Hashtags are just the first step to help people more easily discover what others are saying about a specific topic and participate in public conversations. We'll continue to roll out more features in the coming weeks and months, including trending hashtags and deeper insights, that help people discover more of the world's conversations."

Users are not limited to Facebook hashtags, so users can click on hashtags generated on other online services such as Instagram and Pintrest. Users can create Facebook posts from within their hashtag feed or search results.

Of course, Facebook is keen to promote its privacy settings. Users will only see hashtagged posts from their friends, and from those who make their posts public.  µ

 

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