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Eve Online taken offline in denial of service attack

Tranquility wasn’t living up to its name
Mon Jun 03 2013, 12:15
eve-online-screenshot

THE MASSIVE MULTIPLAYER online roleplaying space opera game Eve Online became Eve Offline this weekend in the face of a denial of service attack.

The MMORPG game has been around for years, and has been targeted in the past. It revealed this weekend's assault in Twitter and Facebook posts, saying that it was suspending services.

"Tranquility has been under sustained DDOS attack - as a precaution we have taken it down once again," it said in a tweeted message that linked to a more detailed Facebook post.

There we read that the attack happened in the small hours of 2 June in the UK, and took the form of a "significant and sustained" DDoS attack on the webservers and what is referred to as the Tranquility cluster.

"Our policy in such cases is to mobilize a taskforce of internal and external experts to evaluate the situation. At 03:07 GMT, that group concluded that our best course of action was to go completely offline while we put in place mitigation plans," explained the firm.

"While we initially reopened Eve Online and Dust 514, we have since re-evaluated. With the highest sense of precaution we have taken Tranquility and associated websites back down for further investigation and an exhaustive scan of our entire infrastructure. We will update you more frequently, however, an extended service interruption of several hours is expected as this process should not be rushed."

So far there has not been a rush to restore services. Messages on Twitter from nine hours ago thank users for their patience, and the last update posted three hours ago said that a fix is close, adding, "Thank you for your continued patience".

Initially the firm took the game offline while it looked into what it described as network issues, and soon after it confirmed that it was under denial of service attack. µ

 

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