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EC is likely to reject Google's proposed search changes

Firm will have to try again
Tue May 28 2013, 13:13
Google logo (Robert Scoble Flickr)

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION (EC) has revealed that it is likely to reject Google's proposed changes to its search services.

Reuters reports that European Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia addressed the European parliament on Tuesday and said that Google's proposed changes to its search are not good enough, and that it's unlikely to signal an end to the EC's ongoing probe into the firm. 

He said that the EC will ask Google to offer more concessions once it has received feedback from the company's rivals, and was quoted as saying, "After, we will analyse the responses received, we will probably ask Google, 100 percent, you should improve your proposals."

Google revealed its proposed changes to its search in April, in a bid to end the EC's ongoing probe against its alleged anticompetitive search practices. These changes included displaying links to three rival specialised search services, separating promoted links from search results and offering all websites the option to opt-out from making their content available in Google's specialised search services.

Following Google's proposal, the EC handed the changes to Google's rivals including Microsoft to discuss whether the changes should be accepted. If today's revelation is anything to go by, it sounds like Microsoft isn't satisfied with Google's proposals.

Almunia has also been quoted as saying that the EC does not yet know whether it will launch an investigation into Google's Android operating system, following complaints from Fairsearch Europe, a body consisting of companies like Microsoft, Nokia and Oracle.

The group claims that Google is using Android as a way to promote its own services over its competitors' services. µ

 

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