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3D printed guns could be banned in California

Updated Senator Leland Yee proposes a law
Fri May 10 2013, 09:30
3d-printed-grun-the-liberator

3D PRINTED GUNS could be banned in California if Senator Leland Yee gets his way.

3D printed guns are getting closer. One was shown off at the end of last week and apparently the blueprints for it have been downloaded thousands of times.

This has worried California state Senator Leland Yee and he is proposing making such guns illegal in California because they can be made, used and fired anonymously.

"While I am as impressed as anyone with 3D printing technology and I believe it has amazing possibilities, we must ensure that it is not used for the wrong purpose with potentially deadly consequences," he said in a statement.

"I plan to introduce legislation that will ensure public safety and stop the manufacturing of guns that are invisible to metal detectors and that can be easily made without a background check."

The firearm that prompted this has the 80s film title the Liberator. Lee said that he didn't like the idea of "felons and criminals" downloading and printing a gun.

He said that there is nothing in place to stop the Liberator from falling into the wrong hands and causing problems.

"We must be proactive in seeking solutions to this new threat rather than wait for the inevitable tragedies this will make possible," he added. Yee has already authored three bills that seek to address gun violence.

Defense Distributed, the outfit behind the Liberator, showed off the handgun in a video at the end of last week.

Update
Late on Thursday Defense Distributed revealed that government pressure had forced it to remove the Liberator from the web.

"#DEFCAD has gone dark at the request of the Department of Defense Trade Controls," it said. "Take it up with the Secretary of State." µ

 

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