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Facebook adds Trusted Contacts security for hacked account recovery

Looks to calm users' security fears
Fri May 03 2013, 11:08
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SOCIAL NETWORK Facebook has launched a security feature called Trusted Contacts to make it easier for users to recover hacked accounts.

Facebook announced the new account recovery feature on Thursday and has already added it for all of its users. The social network explained that Trusted Contacts are essentially emergency contacts for its service, enabling friends to help you regain access to your account if it is compromised or you forget your password.

Facebook advised that you shouldn't pick old school friends that you don't really care about, but instead should choose people "you trust, like friends you'd give a spare key to your house".

A Facebook spokesperson said, "Once you've set up your trusted contacts, if you ever have trouble logging in, you'll have your trusted contacts as an option to help. You just need to call your trusted contacts and let them know you need their help to regain access to your account.

"Each of them can get a security code for you with instructions on how to help you. Once you get three security codes from your trusted contacts, you can enter them into Facebook to recover your account."

"With trusted contacts, there's no need to worry about remembering the answer to your security question or filling out long web forms to prove who you are. You can recover your account with help from your friends."

You can enable Facebook's Trusted Contacts by heading to its security settings, where you can select between three and five friends.

Facebook has long been criticised for its poor security and privacy features, and must be hoping that Trusted Contacts will be appreciated by users who are worried about hackers getting into their accounts. µ

 

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