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Syrian activists continue Twitter hacking spree

Guardian accounts taken over
Mon Apr 29 2013, 11:25
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POLITICALLY MOTIVATED Syrian hacktivists have carried on with their Twitter hacking spree and have compromised some accounts belonging to the Guardian newspaper.

The Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) was active last week, taking over Twitter accounts at the Associated Press.

It apparently got into Associated Press accounts with a sophisticated spear phishing attack, and a Guardian journalist suggested that the newspaper was attacked in a similar way over the weekend.

"Hm. Phishing attack specifically targeted at Guardian journalists in my inbox right now. SEA at work again?," said a message from James Ball.

"The guys doing the Guardian phishing attack I mentioned yesterday (it's SEA) are really very good: sustained, changing, mails today."

The hackers took over 11 Guardian Twitter accounts according to a post from the Syrian Electronic Army, including the Guardian Stage and Guardian Film accounts.

In messages sent from those accounts the group threatened to keep taking over Twitter accounts as long as it was getting its own account shut down. On Friday, the SEA was on its seventh Twitter account, today it is on its 12th.

Messages tweeted and retweeted by the latest SEA account include those sent from Guardian accounts. "Follow the Syrian Electronic Army... Follow the truth!," said one from Guardian Business. Others list the plundered accounts, their usernames and passwords.

Last week the SEA caused panic briefly when it sent out a tweet from the Associated Press Twitter account that claimed US President Obama had been injured in a White House explosion.

The SEA has also taken over Twitter accounts belonging to the BBC in the past. µ

 

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