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David Cameron wants to ban viewing porn on public WiFi

Doesn't understand that it's not like TV
Wed Apr 24 2013, 16:00
Man using a laptop at a train station

UK PRIME MINISTER David Cameron envisions a world where pornography is unavailable on WiFi connections in public places.

Cameron told the Telegraph newspaper that people ought to be able to sit down and enjoy a cup of tea without having to face images of boobies, or worse.

"We are promoting good, clean, WiFi in local cafes and elsewhere to make sure that people have confidence in public WiFi systems so that they are not going to see things they shouldn't," he said.

Cameron was speaking on the local election campaign trail when he painted his picture of a utopian, clean WiFi society, and apparently suggested that a U certificate network would drive punters back out onto the high street.

This is all talk for now, and a Downing Street spokesperson told the BBC that although there had been discussions with some WiFi providers about the feasibility of a scheme that filters out adult material, no one is hovering a finger over a top shelf kill switch.

Back in 2010 the government had more expansive ambitions and was considering banning pornography from the internet completely.

Then MP and communications minister Ed Vaizey planned to meet with BT, Virgin Media and Talktalk to discuss a pornography opt-in system. However the UK Internet Service Providers Association (ISPA) said that control of the internet and access to material should be determined closer to home.

"ISPA firmly believes that controls on children's access to the internet should be managed by parents and carers with the tools ISPs provide, rather than being imposed top-down," it said in a statement at the time. µ

 

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