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Google reveals Glass specifications

Specs appeal
Tue Apr 16 2013, 10:44
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INTERNET SEARCH AND ADVERTISING OUTFIT Google has taken the wraps off its Glass specifications and has started shipping its first developer prototypes of the augmented reality eyewear.

The firm has posted the Google Glass specifications on its support website, and they include, in case anyone was worried, "adjustable nose pads".

Google Glass is what people that want to look a bit silly and keep a record of everything going on around them have been waiting for all their lives.

The Google Glass technical specifications have appeared close to the frequently asked questions about it. There we learned, and it's good that we checked, that you should not wear Glass while operating a jackhammer.

"Glass can't protect your eyes from flying debris, balls, sharp objects, or chemical explosions," said the FAQ. "Using Glass while operating heavy or inherently dangerous equipment, or engaging in physical sports, could distract you, cause Glass to impact your eye, and lead you to harm yourself or others. So play your one-on-one Glass free."

The spectacles promise adjustable nosepads in two sizes, surely a first for computer hardware, and resolution equivalent to that of a 25in high definition screen eight feet away. Glass can take photos at 5MP resolution and record 720p video.

Google claims that Glass is compatible with any Bluetooth enabled phone, but some features including GPS and SMS messaging are limited to handsets running Android 4.0.3 Ice Cream Sandwich.

Glass has both 802.11b/g WiFi and Bluetooth connections, 12GB of usable memory, and a battery that will last for about a full day of "typical use".

A microUSB charger is included and Google recommends that punters stick to using that one, as opposed to another one that they might happen to have hanging around. µ

 

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