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EE doubles 4G network speed as it pushes for one million customers

10 UK cities to get higher speed 4G by summer
Tue Apr 09 2013, 10:25
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UK MOBILE OPERATOR EE announced on Tuesday plans to double the speed of its 4G network, bumping peak speeds to 80Mbit/s.

At an event in London on Tuesday, EE said that "double-speed 4G" will be introduced in 10 UK cities by this summer. These cities are: Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester and Sheffield.

This so-called double-speed 4G will see peak speeds on EE's LTE network rise to 80Mbit/s from 40Mbit/s and will bump the network's average speed to around 20Mbit/s.

EE says it is doing this by doubling the amount of 1800MHz spectrum bandwidth dedicated to 4G, from 10MHz to 20MHz, which means it now owns over a third of all the mobile spectrum in the UK.

So, what will customers be able to do with this double-speed 4G? According to EE, pretty much everything. It boasts that pictures can be quickly uploaded and downloaded in HD, large files can be more easily shared and a "truly mobile office can be a reality," it claims.

EE CEO Olaf Swantee said, "We are ensuring that the UK remains at the forefront of the digital revolution. Having already pioneered 4G here, we're now advancing the country's infrastructure again with an even faster, even higher-capacity network, and at no extra cost to our customers."

Upgrading its 4G network is part of EE's plan to reach one million customers by Christmas 2013. It doesn't sound like it's too far off, boasting on Tuesday that a quarter of all customers joining the EE group, which also includes Orange and T-Mobile, are opting for a 4G contract.

EE said that although its 4G speeds are getting faster, it won't be increasing the prices of its already expensive 4G tariffs. µ

 

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