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Microsoft and Nokia file EU antitrust complaint against Google's Android

Says it favours Google apps
Tue Apr 09 2013, 10:10
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INTERNET GIANT Google is at the centre of another European antitrust complaint orchestrated by Microsoft, this time relating to its Android software.

The antitrust complaint has been filed by Fairsearch Europe, whose members include the likes of Microsoft, Nokia and Oracle. 

The group, which describes itself as an "organization united to promote economic growth, innovation and choice across the internet" is going after Google for its allegedly anticompetitve practices deployed with Android. It's a pretty ironic moment, after Microsoft recently was slapped with a mammoth fine for monopolistic behaviour relating to browser choice on Windows devices.

Fairsearch's lead lawyer Thomas Vinje claimed that Google is using its mobile software as a "deceptive way to build advantages for key Google apps in 70 percent of the smartphones shipped today," adding that Android hardware makers have contractual requirements to keep Google apps at the forefronts of their devices.

Vinje added, "Google is using its Android mobile operating system as a 'Trojan Horse' to deceive partners, monopolize the mobile marketplace, and control consumer data.

"We are asking the Commission to move quickly and decisively to protect competition and innovation in this critical market. Failure to act will only embolden Google to repeat its desktop abuses of dominance as consumers increasingly turn to a mobile platform dominated by Google's Android operating system."

This complaint adds to Microsoft's regulatory attacks on Google, which is already under investigation in Europe for allegedly "anticompetitive" search practices that Fairsearch claims gives Google's shopping and travel businesses unfair advantages in the market.

The European Commission has yet to comment, and it is unclear whether it will investigate the complaint. Google was also unavailable for comment. µ

 

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