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Samsung announces the 4.7in Galaxy Win with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean

Nothing to get excited about
Mon Apr 08 2013, 09:35
Samsung Galaxy Win with Android 4.1

KOREAN PHONE MAKER Samsung on Monday announced the Samsung Galaxy Win, yet another cheap Galaxy S4 alternative.

Although the Galaxy Win made its debut on the internet last week, Samsung today officially unwrapped the smartphone in its hometown of Korea.

There's not a lot to get excited about in the Galaxy Win's specifications. Featuring a design that's nearly identical to that of its flagship sibling, the Galaxy Win has a low resolution 4.7in WVGA LCD display. It also has Samsung's Touchwiz user interface skin overlaying Google's Android 4.1 Jelly Bean mobile operating system.

Samsung also says that the handset has an unspecified quad-core 1.2GHz processor and a 2,000mAh battery under the bonnet, which should offer reasonable battery life.

Other features of the phone include a 5MP rear-facing camera capable of shooting lowly WVGA resolution video and microSD internal storage expansion - although Samsung has yet to specify how much internal storage is provided - plus HSDPA and WiFi connectivity.

Samsung said that the Galaxy Win is "a unique and practical option for mobile users, the GALAXY Win is equipped to handle demanding tasks while still providing an effortless user experience with intuitive features including dual SIM support for a seamless work and life balance, a large display for optimal viewing, Easy Mode for simple access to most used functions, and many more.

While we know that the phone will be released in China and Korea, there's no word on worldwide availability yet. We've contacted Samsung for more information.

The launch of the Samsung Galaxy Win comes just days after Samsung unwrapped the affordable Galaxy Pocket Neo and Galaxy Star smartphones. µ

 

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