The Inquirer-Home

Raspberry Pi model A sold out in US within hours of launch

Flogged 1,000 units
Thu Apr 04 2013, 09:50
Raspberry Pi cake to celebrate one year anniversary from Element 14 Community website

LOW COST TINY PC the Raspberry Pi Model A went on sale in the US on Sunday, and managed to sell almost 1,000 units within a matter of hours.

Model A of the Linux based PC, which costs only $25 and has 256MB of RAM, a single USB port, a HDMI port, a SD card reader and a 3.5mm audio socket, was available from Allied Electronics' online store, but according to the retailer's website, didn't stay in stock for long.

We contacted the Raspberry Pi Foundation regarding sales figures. Its executive director Eben Upton told The INQUIRER that there were fewer than 1,000 units in stock initially.

"These all went within a few hours," Upton said. "I've heard from Allied that they expect to be able to resupply with some hundreds of new boards in the next few days.

"We're currently building a few thousand Model A's a week, so we hope to reach the same stocking situation as the Model B within a couple of months," he added.

The Raspberry Pi model B, which costs $35 and offers two USB slots, 512MB of RAM and an Ethernet port has been on sale in the US for a year now. This is also out of stock at Allied Electronics, but it can be bought at another US retailer called Newark, which sells only that particular model.

The Raspberry Pi, which was originally developed as a way to interest school children in computer technology and programming, has been on sale in Europe for over a year now after it was launched on 29 February 2012 for £19.33.

The device has had a whirlwind first year. On its first day, it managed to crash the websites of the two lucky British firms chosen to retail the machine, and excited buyers were forced to wait for weeks before getting their hands on a Raspberry Pi, as demand far outstripped supply.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation also launched its credit card sized computer in Asia last week. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?