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Apple’s Phil Schiller gets defensive about Samsung’s Galaxy S4

It’s not worth it
Thu Mar 14 2013, 09:58
Apple iPhone fighting Samsung Galaxy SIII

FLOGGER OF FRUIT THEMED GADGETS Apple's Phil Schiller waxed defensive about the Samsung Galaxy S4 just hours before its launch, apparently worried that it might impact iPhone sales.

It might, it might not. But Schiller couldn't help but complain querulously about it.

"There's going to be an incredible amount of pressure on Apple once the Galaxy S4 is out," he said, according to the Wall Street Journal. "The Galaxy S3 is already a very strong offering, and the S4 will obviously offer more things that appeal to users."

Schiller might have been rattled by the noise leading up to the launch of Samsung's next flagship smartphone. The South Korean industrial giant has taken over Times Square in New York with blaring advertising to hype its smartphone, and more recently plastered its marketing material all over London's Picadilly Circus. 

Last week Schiller was alluding to the security of Apple devices when he linked to a mobile security report. He claimed Apple had cruised over the Android competition, and he offered a link to it on Twitter with the tag line, "Be safe out there".

The report from F-Secure showed that Android had the most problems in terms of security vulnerabilities, responsible for 79 percent of all mobile threats last year.

Schiller wasn't just shaken, he was also dismissive about Android and didn't hold back his thoughts about it.

"Android is often given as a free replacement for a feature phone and the experience isn't as good as an iPhone," he said.

"When you take an Android device out of the box, you have to sign up to nine accounts with different vendors to get the experience iOS comes with. They don't work seamlessly together." µ

 

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