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China wants to cooperate with the US in cyber security

Claims it had nothing to do with hacking US companies
Tue Mar 12 2013, 17:33
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THE GLORIOUS People's Republic of China has said it is willing to cooperate with the US in cyber security after the Obama administration called on the country to take "serious steps" to stop such attacks, which could jeopardise trade between the two countries.

On Tuesday, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying repeated China's assertion that it is not to blame for cyber attacks on US companies. Chunying said the country cracks down on hackers according to the law, according to the Associated Press.

"Cyberspace needs rules and cooperation, not wars," Hua said. "China is willing to have constructive dialogue and cooperation with the global community, including the United States."

Obama administration National Security Advisor Tom Donilon made a demand for China to end cyber attacks against the US in a speech on Monday.

"From the President on down, [cyber security] has become a key point of concern and discussion with China at all levels of our governments. And it will continue to be," Donilon said, adding that the US seeks three things from the Chinese government.

"First, we need a recognition of the urgency and scope of this problem and the risk it poses - to international trade, to the reputation of Chinese industry and to our overall relations," he said.

"Second, Beijing should take serious steps to investigate and put a stop to these activities.

"Finally, we need China to engage with us in a constructive direct dialogue to establish acceptable norms of behaviour in cyberspace."

Last month, US security firm Mandiant accused a Chinese military unit of attacking more than 140 mostly American companies.

Mandiant's report claimed that an advanced persistent threat group called APT1 is in fact a secretive branch of China's People's Liberation Army (PLA), codenamed Unit 61398.

The Chinese government denied being involved in cyber theft, and argued that its country has also been a victim of hacking that can be tracked back to the United States. µ

 

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