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Wolfram Alpha will soon be able to read your mind

Computing engine will work pre-emptively, says founder
Mon Mar 11 2013, 17:19
Stephen Wolfram at SXSW

COMPUTATION KNOWLEDGE ENGINE Wolfram Alpha will soon be able to read your mind, its creator Stephen Wolfram said at the South By Southwest (SXSW) conference in Austin today.

Speaking at the US technology conference on Monday, Wolfram predicted that his analytics engine will soon work pre-emptively, meaning it will be able to predict what its users are looking for.

"Wolfram Alpha will be able to predict what users are looking for," Wolfram said. "Imagine that combined with augmented reality."

Speaking during a talk on the future of computation, Stephen Wolfram - the creator of Wolfram Alpha and the mastermind behind Apple's Siri personal assistant - also showed off the engine's new ability to analyse images.

Wolfram said, "We're now able to bring in uploaded material, and use our algorithm to analyse it. For example, we can take a picture, ask Wolfram Alpha and it will try and tell us things about it.

"We can compute all sorts of things about this picture - and ask Wolfram Alpha to do a specific computation if need be."

That's not the only new feature of Wolfram Alpha, as it can also now analyse data from uploaded spreadsheet documents.

"We can also do things like uploading a spreadsheet and asking Wolfram [Alpha] to analyse specific data from it," Wolfram said.

He added, "This is an exciting time for me, because a whole lot of things I've been working on for 30 years have begun converging in a nice way."

This upload feature will be available as part of Wolfram Alpha Pro, a paid-for feature where Wolfram hopes the analytical engine will make most of its money. Wolfram Alpha Pro costs $4.99 per month, or $2.99 if you're a student.

Wolfram also showed off Wolfram Alpha's ability to analyse data from Facebook, a feature that was announced last August. You can try this feature out here. µ

 

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