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RSA: This will be the year of attack disclosure

Companies will become more open to revealing attacks, says panel
Thu Feb 28 2013, 12:57
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THIS WILL BE THE YEAR that companies become more open to disclosing that they've been hacked, according to a panel of security experts at the RSA 2013 conference.

Over the course of 2013 the stigma of being be hacked will end, according to a panel of vendors. The recent string of high profile cyber attacks will prove to firms that there's no shame in being hacked.

"We've seen a lot of companies talk about getting hacked. So if you want to talk about a trend for 2013 it's the end of the stigma of getting hacked, and that is a great thing," said Zscaler VP of research Michael Sutton.

Sutton added that following the recent attacks on Microsoft, Facebook, and Apple, cyber attacks will no longer be considered a dirty little secret.

He and the rest of RSA panel said that every company has been hacked at least once and now they will admit it.

"The bad guys are already in your network. Even if you don't think they are, they're there," said fellow panelist Alienvault labs manager Jaime Blasco.

According to Blasco, disclosures are good for business because it will mean companies start to solve cyber security problems together.

Blasco reported that attackers share information on the workings of malware to better improve their malicious tools.

"The bad guys are already sharing data so we should be doing the same," continued Blasco.

However, there could also be a downside to all this sharing of cyber attack data. Zscaler's Sutton warned that as cyber attacks become more prevalent firms could start to become more complacent.

"The transparency thing is great but it's also frightening," said Sutton. "We've reached a point were when someone says they've been hacked the response is sort of 'meh' so I hope we don't get too complacent." µ

 

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