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Intel releases Apache Hadoop distribution

Touts performance and open source contributions for big data
Wed Feb 27 2013, 14:01
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CHIPMAKER Intel has released its Apache Hadoop distribution, claiming significant performance benefits through its hardware and software optimisation.

Intel's push into the datacentre has largely been visible with its Xeon chips but the firm works pretty hard on software as well, including contributing to open source projects such as the Linux kernel and Apache's Hadoop to ensure that its chips win benchmark tests.

Now Intel has released its Apache Hadoop distribution, the third major revision of its work on Hadoop, citing significant performance benefits and claiming it will open source much of its work and push it back upstream into the Hadoop project.

According to Intel, most of the work it has done in its Hadoop distribution is open source, however the firm said it will retain the source code for the Intel Manager for Apache Hadoop, the cluster management part of the distribution. Intel said it will use this to offer support services to datacentres that deploy large Hadoop clusters.

Boyd Davis, VP and GM of Intel's Datacentre Software Division said, "People and machines are producing valuable information that could enrich our lives in so many ways, from pinpoint accuracy in predicting severe weather to developing customised treatments for terminal diseases. Intel is committed to contributing its enhancements made to use all of the computing horsepower available to the open source community to provide the industry with a better foundation from which it can push the limits of innovation and realise the transformational opportunity of big data."

Intel trotted out some impressive industry partners that it has been working with on the Hadoop distribution and while the firm's direct income from the Hadoop distribution will come from support services, the indirect income from Xeon chip sales is likely what Intel is most looking towards as Hadoop adoption grows to manage the extremely large data sets that the industry calls "big data". µ

 

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