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Microsoft admits it was also a target of Apple and Facebook attacks

Claims no data was lifted
Mon Feb 25 2013, 10:45
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SOFTWARE HOUSE Microsoft has admitted that it too was a target of cyber attacks that exploited vulnerabilities to infect employees' machines at major technology firms including Apple, Facebook and Twitter.

The company confirmed it experienced "a similar security intrusion" in a post on its Security Response Centre blog, saying that it was among the firms to have staff machines compromised.

"During our investigation, we found a small number of computers, including some in our Mac business unit, that were infected by malicious software using techniques similar to those documented by other organisations," said Microsoft's GM of Trustworthy Computing Security, Matt Thomlinson.

No surprise that Microsoft managed to get a dig at Apple as part of its admission, by just happening to mention the inclusion of the Mac unit.

Thomlinson did make clear, however, that the firm believes no data was lifted as a result of the hacking operation.

The infections are believed to be the result of a "watering hole" operation in which software developer website iphonedevsdk.com was compromised and pages were equipped with a series of exploit scripts which then installed malware. The developer website admitted it might have been the source of a malware attack on Thursday.

Apple acknowledged falling victim to the attack on Wednesday, due to exploits that also affected Facebook and Twitter in the past month.

"This type of cyberattack is no surprise to Microsoft and other companies that must grapple with determined and persistent adversaries," Thomlinson added.

"We continually re-evaluate our security posture and deploy additional people, processes, and technologies as necessary to help prevent future unauthorised access to our networks." µ

 

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