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MWC: Ford announces a partnership with Spotify

Music streaming service will appear in Ford in-car entertainment systems
Mon Feb 25 2013, 09:00
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BARCELONA: CARMAKER Ford announced a partnership with music streaming service Spotify on Monday that will see the service arriving on its in-car entertainment systems.

Ford's Applink service will soon be making its debut in Europe, and the firm announced at Mobile World Congress (MWC) that Spotify will be the first music streaming service available on it.

Spotify integration in Ford's Applink service will allow drivers to access Spotify songs and playlists using voice commands, the firm boasts, although it's still unclear whether the service will be available only to Spotify Premium subscribers. These voice commands include "shuffle", "repeat", "star/unstar track", "choose playlist", "play music", "recently played", and "now playing".

Pascal de Mul, global head of hardware partnerships at Spotify said, "Spotify brings you the right music for every moment; on your computer, your mobile, your tablet, your home entertainment system; and soon also in your Ford vehicle.

"Our partnership with Ford AppLink will enable music-loving drivers to enjoy access to Spotify's huge catalogue of more than 20 million tracks safely, while on the road."

As well as a partnership with Spotify, Ford announced its new Ecosport compact SUV at the Barcelona mobile technology show, which will be one of the firm's first vehicles in Europe to offer the Ford Sync Applink system.

"We are entering the age of the connected car and debuting EcoSport at Mobile World Congress underlines just how important advanced vehicle technology is to customers and to Ford," said Paul Mascarenas, Ford CTO and VP of Research and Innovation.

There's no word on pricing or release date details yet. µ

 

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