The Inquirer-Home

AMD announces Turbo Dock to overclock chips in hybrid tablets

More bang from the keyboard
Wed Feb 20 2013, 16:59
AMD logo

CHIP DESIGNER AMD announced its Turbo Dock technology for hybrid tablets allowing processors to be overclocked when they are docked to a keyboard.

AMD's plans to get into the tablet market have been public for many months but the firm has yet to see any of its chips end up in high profile tablets. However that hasn't stopped the firm from talking up new technologies that it hopes will help it beat Intel and high-end ARM Cortex A15 based tablets. The firm's latest technology, dubbed Turbo Dock, will allow hybrid tablets to overclock their CPU and GPU cores when connected to the keyboard.

Tablet makers such as Asus and Samsung have been toying with the idea of a hybrid tablet, one that allows the screen to be detached from a keyboard dock for some time, and Asus has been doing particularly well with its Transformer range.

Now AMD's Turbo Dock will work with the firm's Temash processor, with details of the chip expected to appear next week at Mobile World Congress, allowing the chip to dynamically set clock speeds when the tablet is docked to the keyboard.

Steve Belt, VP of AMD's Ultra-low Power Products division said, "With our latest APUs, AMD aims to deliver a more complete, full featured experience on tablet and hybrid PCs than has been available to date.

"AMD Turbo Dock technology delivers on that promise by dynamically adjusting to what the user is doing to provide the optimal experience and battery life whether they are watching a video, playing a DirectX 11 supported game or building a Powerpoint presentation for work."

AMD said it will demonstrate its Turbo Dock technology next week at Mobile World Congress. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?