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Qualcomm's little known Quick Charge is in most Snapdragon devices

It just forgot to tell us
Thu Feb 14 2013, 17:26
Qualcomm Snapdragon logo

CHIP DESIGNER Qualcomm talked up its Quick Charge 1.0 today, a "little known" technology that helps devices charge up to 40 percent faster than those without it.

For reasons unknown, Qualcomm left it until now to promote the technology, despite having developed and integrated it quite a while ago in Snapdragon powered devices such as the Samsung Galaxy S3, the HTC 8X, the Nokia Lumia 920 and the Google Nexus 4 built by LG.

"Last week at HTC's Frequencies event, our chief marketing officer, Anand Chandrasekher spoke with bloggers about a little known Qualcomm technology which is designed to dramatically decrease the time it takes to charge the battery in a mobile device," the firm said in a blog post today.

"We call this rapid charging technology 'Quick Charge 1.0'."

The technology was obtained through Qualcomm's acquisition of Summit Microelectronics last June. The firm said that a phone without Quick Charge 1.0 could be "stuck plugged in charging for more than four hours", whereas the same phone with the technology can reach its full charge in just three hours or less.

"Quick Charge 1.0 makes all this is available to the user with existing USB charging accessories, [with] no new cables and wall chargers to buy," the chip designer said.

Qualcomm plans to release further details about the technology next week. But why tell us now? It must have forgotten, and finally remembered just last week when the marketing officer talked up the technology in front of a group of journalists. We can see it now, "Oh yeah, didn't we mention this before?"

Nonetheless, Qualcomm Snapdragon device owners can now revel in the glory of knowing that their devices would have taken an hour or so longer to charge if the technology hadn't been implemented. That's good to know, we suppose, even if the news is a little late. µ

 

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