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Amazon, Google and Apple top US reputation table

Online bookseller is in the lead
Wed Feb 13 2013, 11:30
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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FIRMS are breaking into the greater US consciousness and gaining decent reputations, according to the 2013 Harris Poll Reputation Quotient report.

We are in the world of "emotional appeal" here, and the way people connect with businesses.

The latest ranking from Harris Interactive placed Amazon at the top of the list and ranked Apple and Google amongst the top five. Other big firms with good reputations in the US included the Walt Disney Company, Johnson & Johnson and Coca-Cola.

Harris said it polled 14,000 people on their perceptions and asked them to rate 60 firms based upon their experience.

Amazon, which can send you a book in less time than it takes go out and buy one, ranked first with an 82.6 percent positive reputation rating. Apple was in second place with 82.5 percent favourability, the Walt Disney entertainment organisation was third with 82.1 percent and Google was fourth with 81.3 percent.

Just six companies got a "great reputation" score of 80 and above, and Harris reckoned that the American people might be coming to terms with just how satisfying they regard corporate America.

Nearly half, 49 percent of respondents said that corporate America's reputation declined last year, while just seven percent thought it had improved.

"The public seem to have become pragmatically realistic with their expectations of corporate America," said Robert Fronk, EVP of reputation management at Harris Interactive, "and we characterize this year's overall findings as the great muddling of corporate America."

Amazon has made a steady climb to the top, having been in the top five for the last half decade. Last year Apple was first but the iPod maker came in second this time around, while Google, in fourth place, made the top five for the eighth year in a row.

"Amazon has managed to build an intimate relationship with the public without being perceived as intrusive," added Fronk. "And as the company that is so widely known for its personal recommendations, more than nine in ten members of the public would recommend Amazon to friends and family."

Financial services and banking organisations jostled for position at the bottom of the table. µ

 

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