The Inquirer-Home

Blackberry uses Samsung Galaxy S3 chips in its Z10 smartphone

Success breeds familiarity
Tue Feb 12 2013, 13:29
Alicia keys is the crative director for blackberry

CANADIAN SMARTPHONE MAKER Blackberry has used many of the same parts as Samsung's Galaxy S3 LTE smartphone in its Z10 smartphone.

Analyst outfit UBM Techinsights opened up one of Blackberry's Z10 handsets to find out what components are inside Blackberry's latest smartphone. While Blackberry had already announced that it opted for a dual-core 1.5GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor, the firm also used three more Qualcomm chips, with Samsung supplying the memory.

Blackberry's Z10 sports Qualcomm's MSM8960 system on chip (SoC) along with the firm's WCD9310 audio codec, PM8921 power management chip and RTR8600 GSMC, CDMA and LTE transceiver. Samsung supplies the 2GB DDR2 SDRAM and 16GB MLC NAND flash chips, and the analyst outfit noted that the configuration of Qualcomm and Samsung chips is very similar to that of Samsung's own Galaxy S3 LTE smartphone.

UBM Techinsights said, "It's not certain if these decisions the designers made on what semiconductors, ICs and other modules to use were by design or by accident but based on the relative success of the Samsung Galaxy S3, it isn't a bad model to draw from."

Although Blackberry has relied on two chip vendors for most of the high profile silicon in the Z10, it also uses chips from ST Microelectronics, Texas Instruments, RF Micro Devices and Avago, while Synaptics provides the capacitive touchscreen controller chip.

Blackberry's decision to choose just two chip vendors for the high value silicon in its Z10 smartphone shows how chip vendors are moving towards becoming one stop shops for phone makers. Qualcomm in particular is looking strong as its SoC business continues to grow, building on its successful baseband and microcontroller business. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?