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CES keeps the booth babe

Could have restricted them, didn’t
Mon Feb 11 2013, 11:48
Big Bird on stage at the Qualcomm keynote

SIN CITY Las Vegas is the home of the Consumer Electronics Show and the scantily-clad booth babe... for another year at least.

The booth babe traditionally is a young lady who works at a trade show. By work we mean smiles and wears little. They are usually very nice and charming, but they show a lot of skin.

Nonetheless, CES has decided not to enforce a dress code at next year's technology show. This is great news for the fake eyelashes and spandex industries, but bad news for opponents of the tits and teeth style of showmanship.

This is America, of course, a land of freedom. In defending its decision CEA, the firm that runs CES, said in an interview with the BBC, "We do not want to create and impose arbitrary or unenforceable rules, or worse, inch our event towards a Talibanesque ban on exposure of skin."

"Mandating a dress code of business casual for 150,000 people or even for the subset of 51,000 exhibitor personnel, as some suggest, would mean banning blue jeans, t-shirts and other common apparel while also trampling on freedom of expression," said Karen Chupka, CEA's SVP of events and conference.

"More, mandating and enforcing a dress code would present a challenge to our security personnel and divert them from their most important and essential duty: ensuring the safety of all of our customers," she said.

"We also recognise the right of our exhibitors to make individual decisions about marketing their products and their exhibits as they see fit and that meet our legal guidelines as well as generally acceptable standards of decency." µ

 

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