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NASA will hold a Google+ Hangout with the Space Station

Asks people to submit questions
Fri Feb 08 2013, 16:26
Nasa International Space Station

UNITED STATES SPACE AGENCY Nasa has announced that it will be holding a Google+ Hangout session with astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS).

Nasa said it will host an hour-long question and answer session through Google+ Hangouts with three astronauts aboard the ISS on 22 February 2013 between 4PM and 5PM GMT. It urged people to submit video questions through Google's Youtube service tagged with #askAstro by 12 February, adding that the more unique and original they are, the better their chances of being selected.

While Nasa will preselect the video questions for astronauts Kevin Ford and Tom Marshburn of Nasa and Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency, it welcomed written questions from Google+, Twitter and Facebook. Nasa said it will accept real-time questions that are marked with the #askAstro hash-tag on Google+, Youtube and Twitter during the event and that it will open up a thread on its Facebook webpage.

Nasa has broadcast live onboard many of its space vehicles, with astronauts giving tours of spacecraft and answering questions, however this will be the first time Nasa conducts such an event using multiple forms of social media to solicit questions.

Given that Nasa said it would like unique questions, perhaps we can suggest whether the astronauts have any pictures of the poor monkey Iran decided to shoot up into space. Or given the location of the ISS, whether the astronauts have access to satellite television, or whether it even needs a television to see Piers Morgan's head from 250km up.

Nasa said the event will be viewable through its Google+ webpage or through its Youtube channel. µ

 

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