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Symantec rejects blame for New York Times cyber attack

Says its security tools must be used properly
Fri Feb 01 2013, 14:19
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SECURITY FIRM Symantec has claimed that it's not to blame for the prolonged cyber attack on its customer The New York Times, after it was reported earlier this week that the newspaper has been under attack by Chinese hackers for months.

In a statement regarding the attack today, Symantec said that the onus is on the customer to ensure that it uses its security products properly.

"Advanced attacks like the ones the New York Times described underscore how important it is for companies, countries and consumers to make sure they are using the full capability of security solutions," the firm said.

"The advanced capabilities in our endpoint offerings, including our unique reputation based technology and behaviour based blocking, specifically target sophisticated attacks. Turning on only the signature based anti-virus components of endpoint solutions alone [is] not enough in a world that is changing daily from attacks and threats."

Symantec also made it clear that it encourages customers to be very aggressive in deploying security measures, saying, "anti-virus software alone is not enough". However, it didn't clarify whether the New York Times had installed these specific capabilities, and if it did, whether they were enabled on its systems, although Symantec's statement would suggest it didn't.

The New York Times said on Thursday that it has been under attack for four months, but so far it is winning the battle. According to a report published on the New York Times website, the newspaper and a team of security experts have been able to keep the attackers at bay despite persistent cyber attacks on its systems and staff.

Working with security experts it was able to trace the attacks back to China and recognise that they used methods that have been associated with the Chinese military.  µ

 

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