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Linde invests in Voltaix's disilane plant for DRAM and NAND chips

Crucial ingredient for US memory vendor
Mon Jan 28 2013, 15:17
transistors-alt-to-silicon-and-better-than-graphene

RAW MATERIALS FIRM Linde has invested in disilane manufacturer Voltaix to produce disilane.

Linde supplies raw materials to a number of chipmakers including gas used in semiconductor fabrication plants. Now the firm has invested in Voltaix to develop disilane, which is used in fabbing memory chips.

Voltaix's disilane is used to create a smooth amorphous or polycrystalline silicon film in the production of DRAM and NAND memory chips. According to Voltaix, disilane products silicon films less than 5nm thick and consumption of the material will increase considerably as memory makers start to use sub-20nm process nodes.

Voltaix's facilities in Pennsylvania, USA can produce 40 tonnes of disilane per year and Linde claims that the production capacity will allow one US based memory maker to ramp up production of NAND and DRAM chips. Though Linde wouldn't name the manufacturer, given that Micron is the only major American memory manufacturer left, it is a good bet that is the firm set to take advantage.

Voltaix CEO Peter Smith said, "Through the help of one of our key distribution partners, Linde Electronics, Voltaix will become a leading high volume manufacturer of disilane. Disilane is a critical material for low temperature poly-silicon deposition in memory and logic device structures. Its versatility enables it to be used in existing batch furnace and single wafer tool sets with a higher deposition rate providing increased throughput versus that of silane."

Linde said its investment in Voltaix will increase disilane supply for several years, with NAND flash memory chip consumption in particular expected to grow as smartphones and tablets become ever more popular. µ

 

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