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Microsoft advertises its Surface Pro tablet for $000

Online ad lists tablet as worthless
Wed Jan 23 2013, 11:24

TABLET NEWCOMER Microsoft doesn't seem to value its soon to be launched Surface Pro device, according to its recent online advert anyway, which lists the tablet at the very cheap starting price of $000.

In a hurry to spread the news that a more powerful edition of its Surface tablet will be released on 9 February, Microsoft posted the blunder online on Tuesday. And we've got a screen shot to prove it.

surface-pro-only-zero-dollars

In what must have initially got some fans very excited, the inaccurate advert could hint at what's in store for the firm - that is, the need to slash the price of the tablet to catch people's interest. However, we wouldn't have thought that giving them away for free would do Microsoft many favours.

But perhaps a more affordable price tag is what Microsoft needs to push sales, especially considering the relatively disappointing sales of its Surface RT tablet due to stiff competition from Apple and Google.

Take for instance the news last week that Microsoft saw the sales forecast for its Surface RT tablet slashed by UBS analyst Brent Thill, who reported that the firm had not been able to make up much ground on Apple and Google in the holiday shopping season, saying the company ended the season with "gloomy sentiment".

Regardless of what analysts have to say though, Microsoft will be releasing the Surface Pro in the US and Canada from 9 February starting from $899. That will probably get you the cheaper 64GB Surface Pro model, with the 128GB model likely to feature a more extreme price tag.

Microsoft said Tuesday that the Surface Pro will come with a Surface Pen included, although you'll have to fork out between $120 and $130 for the snap-on keyboard in addition to the price of the tablet. Not the best news for buyers on a budget.

Microsoft has yet to spill the details on the UK release of its more powerful tablet. µ  

 

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