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Lookout updates Android security software with Lock Cam

Takes a photo of an unauthorised user and emails it to the victim
Wed Jan 23 2013, 11:00
Lookout Lock Cam settings

MOBILE SECURITY FIRM Lookout has updated its Android security software with a feature dubbed Lock Cam, which emails the victim of a stolen device a photo of the unauthorised user.

In a bid to protect users from possible thieves by exposing them, Lock Cam is a free addition to Lookout's most recent app and silently takes a picture using the device's front-facing camera of anyone who enters an incorrect password three times.

The user will then receive an email with the picture attached and the location of the device. Victims can choose to use this information to either change their password or increase its strength, or if your phone has been stolen, file a police report or insurance claim.

The firm's co-founder and CTO Kevin Mahaffey said the reason for the update was due to smartphones being "our most valuable possessions", thus the increasing the need for people keep their private information from being stolen.

As well as the camera feature, Lookout said the software update has an additional feature for Premium users that allows them to add a customised message to the Lookout Lock Screen. If your phone is lost, you can help whomever finds it return it by displaying a plea for help on the home screen, including a contact number and address.

Lookout last updated its security software in October with a complete redesign and additional features.

Some of the new elements included an overhauled and easier to use dashboard, a locating function when a missing device has a dying battery, protection against click-to-call threats and an "emerging new mobile threats" category. µ

 

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