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Via announces an 800MHz ARM system for harsh environments

Pico ITX based machine has a go anywhere attitude
Tue Jan 15 2013, 21:29
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CHIP DESIGNER Via has announced its ARMOS 800 system using an 800MHz ARM Cortex A8 chip for industrial and in-car applications.

Via has been selling diminutive motherboards and systems for the best part of a decade and has managed to carve out something of a niche among enthusiasts. Now the firm has announced its ARMOS 800 system based around its VAB-800 Pico-ITX motherboard sporting an 800MHz ARM Cortex A8 chip.

According to Via, the ARMOS 800 system is built for tough environments and the firm claims the system can operate in a temperature range of -40C to 80C. As the company has plumped for an 800MHz Freescale ARM Cortex A8 chip, it is able to cite typical power consumption of 3.14W TDP.

Epan Wu, head of Via's Embedded Platform Division said, "The Via ARMOS 800 is the first ARM based system in our ruggedised ARMOS systems series. The high performance and ultra-low power consumption provides an exciting combination for a wide range of industrial embedded applications where robustness is critical."

Aside from Via's choice of the Freescale chip, the ARMOS 800 includes 4GB of eMMC storage that can be expanded wirh a microSD card. The firm has chosen a few old school connectivity options for the device including a serial port, direct IO and one controller area network port, though Via has not forgotten more contemporary options such as HDMI, three USB 2.0 ports and one 10/100 Ethernet port.

Via's ARMOS 800 is yet another niche ARM board, and while consumers will find the Raspberry Pi a far better option, Via is doing a good job of promoting Pico ITX systems, albeit with an ARM chip rather than its own x86 chips. µ

 

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