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CES: Sharp talks up IGZO semiconductors for displays

Technology looks to improve on silicon
Mon Jan 07 2013, 18:57
Sharp company logo

LAS VEGAS: Sharp is unveiling a line of displays and mobile devices based on a unique semiconductor material.

The company said that the material, dubbed IGZO, uses a combination of elements that it claims are more scalable and efficient than traditional silicon semiconductors. Based on a combination of indium, gallium, zinc and oxygen, the semiconductors promise to make devices more efficient and improve battery life, Sharp claims.

Early deployments of IGZO include a handful television models as well as mobile handsets and tablets. The company said that it has already released handsets in Japan and plans to introduce additional models in the country throughout the year.

"This is a leading display technology of this decade," said Kozo Takahashi, EVP of Sharp Electronics Marketing Company of America.

"We are excited to be the first company to mass produce IGZO and for its future potential."

The IGZO material is one of several projects Sharp is counting on to power its upcoming generation of displays. The company is also looking to further its hold on the large-scale television market.

Sharp said that over the course of 2013 the company will step up its efforts in the 60in and larger television sectors, adding new models to its Aquos lineup including a line of 80 and 90in sets.

Sharp president John Herrington said that since 2011, revenues from the 60in and higher category have grown from four per cent of sales to more than 20 per cent of all revenues in the market.

"As we look to 2013, we expect to see greater than 40 per cent growth in the 60in and above category," Herrington told reporters.

"Sharp will continue to lead that growth." µ

 

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