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Top 10 most innovative gadgets for 2013

Mon Dec 31 2012, 10:00

Ouya Gaming System

Ouya games console
The strangely named Ouya games console is an Android-based system that lets users play games on their televisions.

Costing just $100, the Ouya system will offer an app-store like experience where games and gaming will be almost free. For your money you get a Tegra 3 quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM, 8GB of internal flash storage, HDMI, wireless connections, one USB port, a wireless controller and the most recent Android 4.1 Jelly Bean operating system.

When it's released in 2013, the console will ship with a gamepad, like you get with other consoles, a single-touch touchpad, and a soft keyboard for simple input.

Ouya isn't just innovative because it brings a gaming console experience for a super cheap price, but it opens up game development to a much wider set of developers. Whereas before, developers would have to build software with a particular console or consoles in mind, now they can just tinker on one using Android.

Tech21's Impactology

Samsung Galaxy S3 impact band case
Impactology uses science to deliver a protection for mobile devices, tablets and laptops. But what makes Impactology unique is an ingredient in its products that it calls D3O Impact Material. This is a non-Newtonian polymer with a molecular structure, that Tech21 say has been used in the military for its impact protection qualities.

In everyday use, the molecules flow freely, but upon shock or impact they lock together, absorbing the impact force and spreading the shock evenly across the surface of the material. "That means your device stays in one piece, no matter how hard the impact," says Tech21.

Tech21 has already started shipping cases for all the major smartphones and tablets but promises something really big planned for CES in early 2013. We think this new innovative technology is really going to pave the way for a whole new form of device protection products in the year to come.

Google's Project Glass
Google Project GlassGoogle announced its augmented reality eyewear concept named Project Glass back in April this year and we can't help thinking it definitely will be one to watch in the near future.

Bringing science fiction into the real world, the technology was created by a small team of Google engineers and intends to enhance visual reality with data on the fly. Developed over the past two years, the project allows texts, emails, music and more to be beamed directly to your field of vision. It would allow users to set a reminder to buy tickets for a show, receive updates on local travel information and connect with other Glass users remotely via a built in webcam, for example.

Google has said that the stealth project is nowhere near complete and that the project team simply "want to start a conversation and learn from your valuable input". However, it's most undeniably at the top of our favourite innovations from 2012 purely because if it did take off, it could seriously revolutionise the way we connect and interact.

Raspberry Pi
rpi-rev2
The Raspberry Pi pocket computer is without doubt one of the most ground-breaking gadgets that the technology industry has seen for a while.

The credit-card-sized single-board computer developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation is a miniature marvel that shows just how small and cheap you can make a working computer.

As a platform for students to get to grips with programming, the tiny powerhouse device has a Broadcom BCM2835 System on Chip with a 700MHz ARM1176JZF-S core processor, 256MB of RAM and a Videocore 4 GPU supporting HD resolutions up to 1920×1200.

The most amazing part is that the Raspberry Pi computer does all this but measures just 86x54mm and costs a mere £25.

Generating a great deal of interest from tech enthusiasts all over the world, the technology built in and the potential of Raspberry Pi makes it an exceptional piece of kit more than worthy of a spot in our top 10 most innovative products roundup. µ

 

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