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Broadcom outs three ARM Cortex A9 chips for cheap smartphones

For vendors that can't be bothered to design their own chips
Wed Dec 05 2012, 14:16
An Intel chipset

CHIP DESIGNER Broadcom has announced a dual-core ARM Cortex A9 processor for low-end smartphones that run Google's Android 4.2 Jelly Bean mobile operating system.

Broadcom, which designs chips for mid-range smartphones, has released three processors based on ARM's Cortex A9 design offering support for high-definition video and 3G connectivity. According to the firm, the trio of chips will be pitched to smartphone makers that want to churn out smartphones supporting 3G connectivity without having to develop their own chip designs.

Unlike Qualcomm, which has made a conscious decision to apply a marketable name on its chips, Broadcom's three designs carry the monikers BCM21654G, BCM21664T and BCM28145/155. The firm's BCM21654G is a single-core 1GHz chip with a HSPA baseband that supports displays up to HD 720p resolution, while the two other chips are dual-core or "double dual-core" ARM A9 designs supporting HSPA+ baseband chips and HD 1080p resolution video.

Rafael Sotomayor, VP of Broadcom's Mobile Platform Solutions said, "Our turnkey platforms go beyond basic functionality by integrating advanced features previously reserved for high-end phones such as NFC, Wi-Fi direct, advanced multimedia performance, and imaging capabilities. With smartphone functions and features now integrated, our new turnkey platforms will enable OEMs to quickly scale and develop smartphones with competitive differentiators in three months or less and reach a new generation of consumers in emerging markets."

Broadcom says its three new ARM Cortex A9 designs support its own Miracast and NFC chips, effectively allowing it to sell further chips once smartphone makers decide to buy its SoC designs and supporting circuitry. The company said that the three designs are sampling now and volume production is expected to begin this month. µ

 

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