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Mozilla demos WebRTC beta running on Firefox

Video calls and file transfers through the web browser
Mon Dec 03 2012, 12:52
Mozilla Firefox logo

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER Mozilla has shown off WebRTC integration in its Firefox web browser, demonstrating real-time video conferencing and file transfer capabilities.

All major web browser developers have started to integrate the WebRTC protocol and now Mozilla has shown off how far its integration has come. The firm demonstrated working video conferencing, file transfer and sharing capabilities through the Firefox web browser.

Mozilla was keen to push its implementation of the Datachannels API that is part of WebRTC to allow instant messaging and file transfer. The firm's impressive demonstration shows off seamless sharing between two clients that had initiated a video conversation, with tabs and files being sent and viewed with little user interaction.

Mozilla's demonstration does highlight the need for tight sandboxing within the web browser, however as a peer-to-peer protocol that automatically encrypts communications between two hosts, WebRTC could challenge some existing closed communication protocols such as Skype.

Maire Reavy, product lead for Firefox Platform Media at Mozilla said, "WebRTC is a powerful new tool that enables web app developers to include real-time video calling and data sharing capabilities in their products. While many of us are excited about WebRTC because it will enable several cool gaming applications and improve the performance and availability of video conferencing apps, WebRTC is proving to be a great tool for social apps."

Mozilla didn't say when its WebRTC implementation will enter the stable release channel, however given the outfit's rapid release schedule, it should be a matter of weeks rather than months. µ

 

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