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Nokia's Here Maps application is now available for the Iphone

Relieves users of Apple Maps
Tue Nov 20 2012, 11:13
apple-iphone-5

FINNISH PHONE MAKER Nokia's Maps application called Here is now available to download on the Apple Iphone and Ipad.

Nokia unveiled its Google Maps challenger at an event in the US last week where it touted Here as one of the key features of its Windows Phone 8 handsets. However, the Finnish firm also announced plans to bring Here to IOS in a bid to save Idevice users from the misery of using Apple's home-grown Maps application.

The app, which is now available to download for free from the Itunes Store, trumps Apple Maps with its ability to offer live traffic information, voice-guided walking navigation and the ability to give public transport directions.

Nokia explained, "Here Maps helps you feel like a local anywhere you go. See where you are, search and discover nearby places, and get a feel for the place.

"Collect places to remember or for later discovery. Explore new destinations and know instantly how to get there on foot, by car or on public transport. Here Maps is based on the world-class Navteq mapping data used in 90 [percent] of in-car navigation systems in the world."

It might have been in the Itunes Store for little more than a few minutes, but it's already received good reviews from those frustrated with Apple Maps. One user says, "Amazing, just like Google Maps. 100 times better than Apple Maps," which will no doubt leave the Finnish phone giant feeling pretty smug.

If you're not so keen on Nokia's Here Maps, Google Maps is set to arrive on IOS any day now. A Google insider last week revealed that the firm was just putting the "finishing touches on the app" before submitting it to the Itunes App Store. µ

 

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