The Inquirer-Home

Samsung fabs 64Gb NAND chips on a 10nm process node

Expect more storage on smartphones and tablets in 2013
Fri Nov 16 2012, 15:13
samsung logo 2

MEMORY MAKER Samsung has put its 10nm class 64Gb NAND flash memory chips into production.

Samsung's latest 64Gb NAND flash chips use the firm's leading edge 10nm class process node. According to the firm the chips, which use the embedded multimedia card (eMMC) standard, conform to the eMMC Pro Class 2000 specifications.

Samsung claims its 64Gb modules have a random write rate of 2,000 IOPS and a random read rate of 5,000 IOPS, while sequential read and write bandwidths are 260MB/sec and 50MB/sec, respectively. Perhaps even more important is the firm's ability to shave a few millimetres off the chips, which are now 11.5mm by 13mm, allowing slightly more PCB space for device designers.

Myungho Kim, VP of memory marketing and device solutions at Samsung Electronics said, "We look forward to expanding our line-up of embedded memory solutions in conjunction with the new chip's design, in pursuing a system-level adoption of application processors and other key components that form the foundation for the most advanced mobile platforms. This will allow us to better attend to time-to-market demands enabling the design of more convenient features for next-generation mobile applications."

While Samsung is using its 64Gb eMMC chips to showcase its 10nm class process node, the firm said the same memory chips are process compatible on its more mature 20nm class process node.

Samsung said it expects the chips to end up in smartphones and tablets and touted its performance as enabling multi-tasking and the playback of HD 1080p video. The firm said that its 64Gb NAND flash chips went into production late last month, meaning that they should end up in mobile devices by the middle of next year. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Heartbleed bug discovered in OpenSSL

Have you reacted to Heartbleed?