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Intel and Red Hat invest in NoSQL MongoDB maker 10gen

Time for IBM and Oracle to take NoSQL seriously
Wed Nov 14 2012, 16:07
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SOFTWARE DEVELOPER 10gen has announced funding from Intel and Red Hat to support its growing MongoDB operations.

10gen has developed significant interest with its main NoSQL product, MongoDB. That success has resulted in the firm gaining funding from Intel Capital and Red Hat in order to support the MongoDB community, though it wouldn't reveal the size of the investment.

With 10gen's MongoDB being one of the most visible NoSQL products on the market, the firm has been slowly building up its presence in the traditionally conservative database market that is dominated by IBM Oracle. Unlike Oracle's relational databases that use columns and rows to store data, NoSQL databases treat data as objects, each with its own schema.

Lisa Lambert, VP of Intel Capital talked up the NoSQL market and said that the firm wants to work with 10gen to increase adoption of MongoDB. Lambert said, "The NoSQL marketplace has gone through a huge transformation from a community driven market to running production systems for some of the world's largest infrastructures."

10gen and Red Hat have been working together on Openshift since 2011, so it is not surprising to see the two firms getting closer. Max Schireson, president of 10gen said, "We look forward to our new relationship with Intel Capital and to collaborating more closely with Red Hat to better enable and support our joint customers with integrated solutions and technologies."

Now that 10gen has got a couple of established companies ploughing money into it, the enterprise relational database vendors such as Oracle and IBM might start to take NoSQL seriously. µ

 

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