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Intel launches Poulson Itanium 9500 chips

Continues to drag the anchor
Fri Nov 09 2012, 15:11
An Intel logo on a piece of equipment

CHIPMAKER Intel has released its Itanium 9500 series processors previously codenamed Poulson.

Intel's Itanium chip rumbles on thanks in large to HP pushing the chips in its Integrity servers. Now Intel has delivered a significantly altered architecture for its Itanium 9500 series, the last Itanium product that will have a different socket from the firm's far more popular Xeon processors.

According to Intel, its Itanium 9500 series chips boast higher linear performance scaling than its previous generation Tukwila Itanium chips. The firm also claimed, yet again, that its Itanium chips are the most complex silicon it makes with 3.1bn transistors, eight cores and 54MB of on-die cache.

Intel's Itanium 9500 series chips range from 1.73GHz at a TDP of 130W to 2.53GHz at a TDP of 170W. The firm has upped the addressable memory of each chip allowing for 2TB to be addressed in four socket configurations.

Diane Bryant, VP and general manager of Intel's Datacentre and Connected Systems Group said, "Built on a new microarchitecture and providing breakthrough performance, the Intel Itanium 9500 processor family signals Intel's ongoing commitment to deliver unparalleled reliability, availability and scalability to meet the critical application demands across all industries."

While Intel's 9500 series chips might sound impressive on paper like all Itanium chips do, the firm's dwindling list of supporting cast members is worrying. Intel cited Bull, Hitachi, HP, Inspur and NEC system vendors and while Oracle, SAP and SAS were there on the software side, Oracle's very public spat with HP is unlikely to see it counted as a strong supporter of the architecture or the systems built around it.

Intel's list price for Itanium 9500 series processors runs from $1,350 to $4,650 in 1,000 unit quantities. µ

 

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