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UK judge blasts Apple’s lack of integrity over Samsung apology

Firm stops hiding legal notice but it remains tucked away
Fri Nov 09 2012, 12:30
Judge's gavel

A UK JUDGE has blasted Apple's "lack of integrity" over the way it handled its apology to Samsung for not having copied its Ipad tablet.

The long running farce revolves around a UK court case between the two firms relating to the design of Samsung's Galaxy Tab. The court case and a subsequent appeal both found for Samsung.

In a unique twist, the judge overseeing the case ordered Apple to display a notice on its website and publish adverts in magazines and newspapers explaining to the public that Samsung had been found not to have infringed Apple's Ipad design, in order to clear up any confusion.

However, Apple's initial apology on its website was challenged by Samsung over its highly condescending wording and irrelevant references to other, unrelated court cases in the US and Germany where Apple prevailed against Samsung.

UK Court of Appeal Judge Robin Jacob agreed that Apple failed to comply with the court's order and was angered by Apple's stance, especially when it claimed it would need 14 days to amend the homepage on its website containing the notice.

In his subsequent written judgment explaining his decision Judge Jacob again expressed his dim view of Apple's actions in the case.

"I hope that the lack of integrity involved in this incident is entirely atypical of Apple," he wrote in his judgment published Friday morning.

As part of the judgment Apple had amend its notice and publish a second notice on its homepage concerning the first statement, acknowledging that it had not complied with the court's order.

Apple did this but hid the required text below at the bottom of its homepage using Javascript code to ensure that users would only see it if they scrolled down to the bottom of the page. Apple has now removed this code, although only those with large high-resolution displays now see it directly. µ

 

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