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Facebook is doing a good job to counter security threats, says F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen

Exclusive Interview Despite being one of the most targeted websites in the world
Wed Oct 31 2012, 13:13
F-Secure analyst Mikko Hypponen

SECURITY OUTFIT F-Secure's chief security researcher, Mikko Hypponen has defended Facebook's security strategy, saying that the firm is "doing a good job" to prevent attacks despite being one of the most targeted websites in the world.

Speaking with The INQUIRER in an exclusive interview today, Hypponen said, "It's very hard trying to defend yourself when you're one of the biggest single targets on the planet."

"They get targeted a lot they have a very good security team. They are world class [and] are doing a good job."

The F-Secure researcher's comments are in contrast to those made by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales at the RSA security conference earlier this month, who said that Facebook needs to spend a lot on security because a large scale security breach at the social network could "destroy the company".

Wales explained that people are getting more concerned about the amount of data companies are collecting and because of this, it's difficult for businesses like Facebook whose businesses are tied up with customer service.

However, talking about privacy, Hypponen said it is not in the social network's interest.

"The more information [Facebook] can deduct from you the better for them," Hypponen said. "We must not get that wrong, it doesn't mean that Facebook wants to harm you - they don't want to harm you they want to gain as much information about you [as they can] without alienating you. It's a fine balancing act they want to do, and privacy is against their interest."

Hypponen added that the fact that Facebook can pinpoint a user's profile at such a level is "disturbing".

"In Europe we don't seem to mind at all that we are giving all of our profile information to this American company on the other side of the Atlantic."

"[Facebook] probably knows more about us than any local company or government over in Europe, and no one seems to mind," he said. µ

 

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