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EE to exclusively offer grey 4G Samsung Galaxy S3 with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean

Promises blazing fast LTE speeds
Tue Sep 11 2012, 11:36
Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE Android Jelly Bean

UK MOBILE NETWORK EE, which launched the country's first 4G network today, has revealed to The INQUIRER that it will exclusively offer the titanium grey Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE running Android 4.1 Jelly Bean.

Speaking at a launch event in London, an EE spokesperson revealed to us that the Samsung Galaxy S3 will be amongst the network's first 4G LTE devices. What's more, the operator will be exclusively selling the titanium grey S3 model, and will ship the device running Android Jelly Bean.

Unfortunately EE was unable to quote a release date or pricing just yet, but the handset is expected to arrive in the coming weeks.

We got a short hands-on with the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE smartphone, and EE showed us the blazingly fast 4G speeds the phone can reach. During our time with the Galaxy S3 LTE it reached download speeds of 38.4Mbit/s and upload speeds of 24.8Mbit/s - around six times the speeds typically found on a 3G phone. EE boasts that this makes the phone ideal for downloading HD movies in minutes, watching live TV and downloading large email attachments.

Unfortunately we were unable to see Android 4.1 Jelly Bean in action on the Samsung flagship, but users can expect to see a refreshed interface, Project Butter buffering, Google Now and tighter integration with the Google Now store. According to Samsung, owners of the Galaxy S3 can expect the Android 4.1 Jelly Bean update to arrive soon.

EE's superfast 4G LTE network will start rolling out from today in London, Birmingham, Bristol and Cardiff, with an additional 12 cities set to receive the faster service in time for Christmas. µ

 

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