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Western Digital slaps two Velociraptor drives into a Thunderbolt case

Cuts the warranty by two years
Thu Aug 30 2012, 16:56
wdfvelociraptor

STORAGE VENDOR Western Digital has bunged two 1TB Velociraptor hard drives into a Thunderbolt enclosure.

Western Digital's Velociraptor hard drives are still the only consumer grade 10,000 RPM hard drives on the market and the firm revamped the drives earlier this year to hit the 1TB capacity milestone. Now the company has stuck two of its 1TB Velociraptor drives into a Thunderbolt case and branded it as the My Book Velociraptor Duo.

The firm claims the 2TB My Book Velociraptor Duo unit is good for those who work with video and graphics and says the Thunderbolt interface offers up to 400MB/s bandwidth. Western Digital said the drive can be set up either as RAID 0 striping for performance, offering 2TB of storage, or RAID 1 mirroring for redundancy, dropping the capacity to 1TB.

Western Digital also announced it has updated its My Passport for Mac drives to support USB3 and increased top-end capacity to 2TB. It's hard to see how Western Digital claims its My Passport drives are specifically designed for the Mac, nevertheless those Mac users who need the security of having items branded for their beloved Mac in order to sleep at night will be able to access their data a bit faster.

Western Digital has slapped a three-year warranty on both the My Passport for Mac and the My Book Velociraptor Duo. In the case of the latter, Western Digital typically offers a five year warranty on bare Velociraptor drives, so consumers tempted by this offer might want to buy the drives and a Thunderbolt enclosure separately to get two extra years of warranty.

Western Digital said that the My Book Velociraptor Duo is available now and has a price tag of £700. µ

 

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