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Kingston launches enterprise SSDNow E100 drives

Claims 10 times the reliability of consumer drives
Tue Aug 28 2012, 14:55
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MEMORY VENDOR Kingston has announced its first solid-state disk (SSD) drives pitched at the enterprise market.

Kingston's range of SSDs branded as SSDNow has been a fixture in the consumer market for some time, but now the firm, best known for its server and router memory, has announced a range of SSDs for the enterprise market. The firm announced its SSDNow E100 range of multi-level cell (MLC) SSD drives, claiming significantly higher cell endurance compared to consumer SSDs.

Kingston's SSDNow E100 range includes three 2.5in SATA3 drives with capacities of 100GB, 200GB and 400GB. The firm claims sequential read and write bandwidths of 535MBps and 500MBps, respectively, with random read and write performance of between 52,000 to 59,000 IOPS and 37,000 to 83,000 IOPS, respectively.

Ariel Perez, SSD business manager at Kingston said, "Companies worldwide have come to depend on Kingston server memory for reliability and performance. We are proud to introduce the SSDNow E100 enterprise-class SSD to help organizations handle such initiatives as big data and virtualized environments. The drive's higher endurance and reliability, along with higher IOPS make it an integral part of a datacenter where uninterrupted 24/7 operation is mission critical."

Kingston said its SSDNow E100 drives have a mean time before failure (MTBF) of 10,000,000 hours, but interestingly they don't support TRIM, something that could lead to considerable performance degration over time. Nevertheless, the firm is likely to find takers for its enterprise SSDs as it has a good reputation for its DRAM products in the staid enterprise market.

Kingston did not reveal pricing for its SSDNow E100 series of SSDs. µ

 

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