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Nvidia releases Kepler based mobile Quadro GPUs

Touts more memory and fewer jaggies
Wed Aug 08 2012, 15:33
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CHIP DESIGNER Nvidia has released its mobile Quadro K5000M GPU based on its latest Kepler architecture.

Following Nvidia's announcement that it will finally bring its Kepler architecture to the workstation market in the desktop Quadro K5000 board, the firm didn't waste any time announcing mobile Quadro K series parts. Nvidia has announced a bevvy of Kepler-based mobile Quadro parts topped by the Quadro K5000M.

Nvidia didn't go into clock or memory speeds, which are likely to be tweaked by each OEM that picks up the chips, but the firm did say that the boards will sport either a 2GB or 4GB frame buffer, support up to 128X full-screen antialiasing when in SLI mode and can texture and render 16,000 by 16,000 pixel surfaces.

Nvidia's full range of mobile Quadro GPUs includes the Quadro K500M, Quadro K1000M, Quadro K2000M, Quadro K3000M, Quadro K4000M and the Quadro K5000M. While Nvidia's chips are intended for laptops, HP has stuck the Quadro K1000M into its Z1 all-in-one workstation.

Dell is one of the few laptop makers that offers the top-of-the-range Quadro K5000M GPU in its Precision M6700 Covet machine. The firm went all out to create a machine that would rival anything sitting underneath a desk but in order to get Nvidia's Quadro K5000M, prices start at £3,700 and go up from there.

Both AMD and Nvidia know that ISV certification for a particular application is the bare minimum when it comes to making a sale in the professional graphics market and both firms work hard to get their products certified. Nvidia said its mobile Quadro K series cards have ISV certification from Adobe and Autodesk among others to ensure making sales.

Dell, Lenovo and Fujitsu are taking orders for laptops sporting Nvidia's updated mobile Quadro GPUs. µ

 

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