The Inquirer-Home

Judge orders Google and Oracle to hand over names of paid bloggers

Copyrights and patents case isn't over yet
Wed Aug 08 2012, 10:07
google logo headquarters sign search engine seo

A UNITED STATES District Court judge has ordered Google and Oracle to hand over the names of journalists and bloggers they have paid during the Java copyrights and patents lawsuit.

Judge William Alsup has ordered the two companies to cough up the names by Friday 17 August, suggesting that the court thinks at least one side was paying writers to comment on the case.

"The Court is concerned that the parties and/or counsel herein may have retained or paid print or internet authors, journalists, commentators or bloggers who have and/or may publish comments on the issues in this case," read Alsup's order.

"Although proceedings in this matter are almost over, they are not fully over yet and, in any event, the disclosure required by this order would be of use on appeal."

A spokesperson for Oracle told The INQUIRER that the company will comply with the judge's order.

"Oracle has always disclosed all of its financial relationships in this matter, and it is time for Google to do the same," they said. "We read this order to also include indirect payments to entities who, in turn, made comments on behalf of Google."

This court order follows a trial between to two companies, which ended in a Google victory in May that Oracle will appeal.

Judge Alsup ruled that the 37 application programming interfaces (APIs) that Oracle had claimed Google infringed were not copyrightable. The lawsuit resulted in Oracle getting a bill for some of Google's legal expenses, to the tune of $4m, over which the parties are still fighting.

Google declined to comment on the order. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?