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Tweeting is bad news for Olympic systems

Spectators asked to spectate
Mon Jul 30 2012, 11:06
business-people-group

THERE WAS SO MUCH tweeting going on at a recent Olympic event that spectators were told to put their smartphones away and just enjoy the show.

Reuters reports that people attending the Olympics on Sunday evening were so keen to let the rest of the world know what they were doing that they nearly caused television coverage to break down.

Problems came to a head when GPS signals, sent from racing bikes, about speed and distance, were unable to get through to commentators because of the volume of data traffic. They were compounded when people started tweeting about how annoying that was.

An International Olympic Committee spokesman said the network problem was caused by the sheer volume of messages being sent, adding that if people could go easy on the number of messages they send, that would be appreciated.

"Of course, if you want to send something, we are not going to say 'Don't, you can't do it', and we would certainly never prevent people," he said. "It's just - if it's not an urgent, urgent one, please kind of take it easy."

Elsewhere, unnamed problems lead to payment firm Visa's systems being turned off at a team GB football match at Wembley this weekend.

A spokesperson for Visa confirmed that the Wembley systems had gone down, but added that the decision to only accept cash was down to the management there, and not itself.

"We understand that Wembley's systems failed and therefore they were only accepting cash at the food and beverage kiosks," said a spokesperson.

"This cash only decision was made by Wembley management and not Visa. We are working with the Wembley team to help them fix this as soon as possible." µ

 

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