The Inquirer-Home

Sony says getting rid of Ericsson was important

Allowed it to become fully integrated
Tue May 29 2012, 11:59

JAPANESE ELECTRONICS GIANT Sony has said that losing Ericsson was an important step in saving its flailing mobile business, enabling the firm to become "fully integrated".

Sony, which Richard Kramer of Arete Research called "the most dangerous company on the planet on paper", acquired Ericsson's stake in Sony Ericsson last October for $1.47bn.

Speaking at the Open Mobile Summit in London on Tuesday, Sony heralded the move as a wise step for the company, allowing it to bounce back in the mobile market. Steve Walker, chief marketing officer at Sony Mobile said, "With Ericsson, we were affiliated with the rest of the Sony group. Now, we're fully integrated."

"Being fully integrated makes a big difference," he said, referring to Xperia phones' ability to share content wirelessly to Sony TVs and its recently launched Playmemories media cloud. He also took a dig at devices such as the Iphone 4S and Samsung Galaxy S III, adding, "You don't need to release something 'exclusive' to grab a customer's attention, you have to offer a connected experience."

Walker noted that one of Sony's main priorities was to beef up Playstation integration on mobile devices, dismissing rumours that it could be planning to launch a second-generation Xperia Play handset.

"Bringing the Playstation Network to other devices is important. Doing so creates a community based relationship with customers, like those found on social networking web sites."

Sony might be focusing on integration between devices and software enhancements, but Walker promised that Sony also has some exciting hardware innovations up its sleeve.

"When the Motorola Razr came along we were shocked, it was a true hardware innovation. We will continue to focus on this with our future devices too." µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?