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Researchers crack the Samsung Galaxy S III

Android smartphone rooted just weeks before UK launch
Mon May 21 2012, 18:16
samsung-galaxy-s3-android-smartphone

RESEARCHERS have revealed how to crack Samsung's eagerly awaited Galaxy S III Android handset just weeks before the firm's flagship smartphone hits the shops in the UK.

In a posting to the XDA Developers blog, researcher 'Chainfire' revealed a procedure for modifying the software kernel on the handset and gaining root access privileges.

The researcher credited an unnamed source in helping to obtain the root access which could allow users to unlock their Galaxy S III smartphones. In the post, Chainfire also credited Samsung for its particularly lenient stance on allowing users to unlock their handsets.

"This root is, as expected, trivial," the researcher said. "It was a simple matter of repacking the stock kernel, with a modified adbd binary."

The release comes ahead of the planned 30 May release date for the Galaxy S III. Samsung unveiled the handset in London earlier this month. The Android smartphone will sport a 1.4Ghz quad-core processor and 32GB of storage.

The act of unlocking and jailbreaking smartphones has become a contentious issue between hobbyist users and device vendors.

Users have suggested that buying the handset gives consumers the right to modify their devices, while vendors have maintained that the act of jailbreaking a smartphone voids warranties and leaves users vulnerable to security flaws and compatibility issues with updates.

Jailbreaking has been particularly popular among Iphone users, who have used the procedure as a means for sidestepping the restrictions of Apple's App Store. Consumer advocacy groups have also come out in support of the procedure, asking government bodies to ensure protections for consumers who jailbreak their devices. µ

 

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