The Inquirer-Home

Microsoft boasts of quicker recovery from NTFS corruption

Claims it will reduce downtime
Thu May 10 2012, 14:32

SOFTWARE REDEVELOPER Microsoft has revamped recovery from NTFS disk corruption in Windows 8, claiming it will reduce downtime.

Microsoft is well into its hype-generation phase for Windows 8 and while its Metro interface is the most visible change from previous versions of its operating system, the firm claims to have reworked the chkdisk utility and NTFS in order to reduce downtime resulting from disk corruption. The firm said the changes in NTFS will help it scale better with increasing hard disk drive sizes and file numbers.

Kiran Bangalore, a programme manager at Microsoft said, "In past versions, NTFS implemented a simpler health model, where the file system volume was either healthy or not. In that model, the volume was taken offline for as long as necessary to fix the file system corruptions and bring the volume back to a healthy state. Downtime was directly proportional to the number of files in the volume."

Microsoft said its new health model for NTFS will do more tasks online, meaning that users will not have to reboot. Bangalore said there will be self-healing file system verification and identification, all of which will be done while the hard disk remains online.

Although Microsoft said it wants to improve uptime in Windows 8, some of the repair activities still need a reboot, such as spot fix. Bangalore claimed that spot fix, which will run chkdisk, will not add more than a few seconds to boot-up time.

Bangalore also referred to the firm's next generation ReFS, which will eventually replace NTFS. He said that ReFS will not require an offline chkdsk, with rebooting required, in order to repair hard disk corruption.

Microsoft says that Windows 8 will tip up just in time for this year's holiday buying season. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Heartbleed bug discovered in OpenSSL

Have you reacted to Heartbleed?